Creating a Culture of Engagement: Why It’s Both Simple and Hard

Published on March 30, 2013 by

Creating a culture of engagement isn't a matter of rocket science--it's pretty simple. It's not that we don't know what to do to solve our employee engagement problems--it's that we fail to do what we know. For instance, most every leader knows how important it is to:

  • Have a compelling vision
  • Be someone we can trust
  • Hire the right person for the right role
  • Reassign or "coach out" anyone that isn't the best fit for a role
  • Give your  everything they need to do great work
  • Challenge your team
  • Stop doing what gets in their way
  • Listen, listen, listen
  • Recognize their contributions
  • Encourage risks and failures

I could go on and on--and so can you.

Our problem isn't in the knowing department--it's in the  doing department.

The knowing is simple.

The doing is hard. 

Why do you think the doing seems to be so hard for so many of us?

 

5 Comments

  1. Dan Black

    It's easy to know and talk the talk however it takes a lot of energy, time, and effort to actually do. But it's the different between success and failure. Great thoughts!

    • Alan Allard

      "...it takes a lot of energy, time, and effort to actually do. But it's the different between success and failure." Absolutely true--thanks for your participation here.

      • Dan Black

        Your post is great! A key too success and achievement. Keep writing great content!

  2. Rob

    Interesting, and much of the same thing can be said for what employees need to do to create their own engagement:

    - Have a clear vision for what you want
    - Find a role that offers these opportunities on a satisfactory level
    - Nurture and expand your skills
    - Incorporate into your plan things that will improve your organization (Always be improving something!)
    - Treat people with respect
    - Honor your commitments
    - Communicate what’s important to those who need to know
    - Request help when needed
    - Etc.

    The first thing that comes to mind for why I don’t prioritize these things at times like I could is prioritization. In this time of most everyone having way more to do than they could possibly do, getting caught up in the frenzy of activity is a big temptation. I find that the more I do these things, the more engaged I am.

    • Alan Allard

      Rob, great list of what "employees" can do to create a culture of engagement. You are right that "getting caught up in the frenzy of activity is a big temptation." The more we realize that no one can or will care about our careers as much as we do, the more likely we are to prioritize sooner versus later. Thanks for you comments and insights.

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